Monday, April 25, 2011

Sarah Palin's 'Wild Ride' -- Part II

Politico's story, "Mission for anti-Palin movement: Expose her," is interesting. The story seems to raise expectations for the upcoming books by Frank Bailey, Joe McGinniss and Geoffrey Dunn. Will any of them achieve "their ultimate goal: the absolute and complete exposure of Palin as a fraud unworthy of a role in American civic life?"

I don't know the value of beating a dead horse, but some believe that the only way to completely expose Palin as a fraud is to prove that she did not give birth to Trig Palin. They've been unable to do so. It must be very frustrating. Why doesn't the mainstream media state that she faked the pregnancy? Is there a "spiral of silence?" I think not. The mainstream media wants evidence that would prove that Palin faked the pregnancy. With evidence, the story would be everywhere.

What is that evidence? It isn't pictures from the internet; it isn't a statement by anyone that Palin didn't appear to be pregnant. It's a birth certificate! which would name the birth mother. But in Alaska it isn't until 100 years after a birth that birth records are available to the public; until 2108:
  • A person may obtain only his or her own birth certificate, except for parents who may obtain their own child's certificate.

  • A birth certificate can also be furnished to a legal guardian, a legal representative, or to a person who provides documentation showing the birth certificate is needed for the determination of property rights. A legal guardian must submit a certified copy of the guardianship papers granted by the court when requesting a birth certificate. If you are a legal representative, include a letter stating whom you represent and how you are related to the person named on the record.

  • Use the full first, middle, and last names as they appear on the certificate when filling out the request form.

  • We can only process requests for births that occurred in Alaska. For births that occurred outside of Alaska, requests must be sent directly to the appropriate state.
Of course, one could ask Sarah Palin to show the birth certificate (assuming that she has one or can obtain one from the state). But she is under no obligation to do so, because the burden of proving that she is not the natural mother rests with those claiming that she is not the birth mother; and she is not required to cooperate with them.

Some have said that Obama showed his (birth certificate), so Palin ought to show Trig's. Imagine that! Trig Palin isn't running for President; he won't be eligible to run for another thirty years or so.

I could go on, but time would fail me to tell of all the absurdities ... , so I'll just tell you what I think. This is my personal opinion. Like all opinions it doesn't prove a thing: The "Wild Ride" is a tall tale. Sarah Palin never said she leaked amniotic fluid; her dad, Chuck Heath, did. Some people exaggerate. Some may have thought that the "Wild Ride" painted a larger-than-life, heroic picture of Palin. So, was she pregnant? I don't know! It's possible she faked it, but possible that she was pregnant. I may never know, but I won't believe that she faked it unless convincing evidence appears.

22 comments:

theperilsofpalins said...

Is this or is this not a transcript of Sarah Palin talking to a reporter?

Reporter: So did your water break?

Palin: Well, if you must know more of those type of details, but, um…

Reporter: Well, your dad said that and I saw him say it so that’s why I asked.

Palin: Well that was again if, if I must get personal, technical about this at the same time, um, it was one, it was a sign that I knew, um, could lead to uh, labor being uh kind of kicked in there was any kind of, um, amniotic leaking, amniotic fluid leaking, so when, when that happened we decided OK let’s call her.

Joie Vouet said...

Here is the doubt about leaking amniotic fluid, from Professor Sharlott, page 3:

Palin returned to work three days after the purported birth and held a press conference. A
reporter there asked if her water broke in Texas. When Palin balked at the question, the reporter
said Chuck Heath, Palin’s father, had said that, and then Palin seemed uncertain how to answer:
“So that was again, if, if I must get personal, technical about this at the same time, um, it was one,
uh, it was a sign that I knew, um, could lead to, uh, labor being, uh, kind of kicked in there, was
any kind of, um, amniotic leaking, amniotic fluid leaking, so when, when that happened we
decided let’s call her [“her” being Dr. Baldwin-Johnson, Palin’s physician].”

Palin thus seemingly confirmed that her water broke in Texas, although her answer was
sufficiently muddled that one might argue otherwise. In any event, KTUU reported that Palin’s
water indeed broke in Texas, and if that is true, then it’s also true that she waited some 20 hours
before going to a medical facility.


You could consider the family dynamics. When Dad is given to exaggerating, it can be difficult to say that he misspoke.

She may have leaked urine, had a scare that it was amniotic fluid and called home about it.

Nancy said...

At this point, a birth certificate really wouldn't prove anything other than where the child was born and confirm the date of the birth.

In the case of an adoption, the birth certificate lists the adoptive parents as the birth parents.

Whoa, Baby! said...

You really should correct your post to reflect the facts that have been presented here in the comments section. The previous two posters are absolutely correct; Palin verified that she was indeed leaking amniotic fluid.

theperilsofpalins said...

Whether Sarah Palin mistook urine for leaking amniotic fluid or was just in yet another lie is irrelevant to what she says occurred. Her account in her book still had her thinking she was going into premature labor. Are you saying she lied in her book too to protect her dad's mouthy mouth? The reason this story has always had legs (I have mostly been in the Wild Ride camp, not the hoax camp)is because Sarah has told so many different stories and obstructed all efforts to straighten out the accounts and make sense of them. And also because the Wild Ride version is just about as ridiculous as a pregnancy hoax. Either she lied, or did something completely dangerous and irresponsible, or both. THAT is what makes her unfit for public office and shows her in a very bad light. THAT is why the media has been derelict in their duty.

Joie Vouet said...

If there was an adoption, a birth certificate might not contain the birth mother's name (but I don't know what Alaska does about that). If there were doubts about the birth certificate, would a look at the medical records be conclusive? If there is no record of a birth, would anyone claim that the records are incomplete (missing pages?)

theperilsofpalins said...

An adoptive birth certificate would show the adoptive parents AND the actual birthdate. It is the birthdate that people want to see. Anybody who has been paying attention already knows it won't show the real mother if that person is not Sarah. Birthdate is the only useful piece of information on that birth certificate.

Joie Vouet said...

Well, I'm happy with my theory (the Wild Ride is a tall tale); others are happy with theirs. Everyone is or should be happy.

The controversy generates sympathy for her among her supporters. They may be aghast: "How could anyone doubt a mother's word?" The decision to announce Bristol's pregnancy at the 2008 convention was risky, because some people were concerned that the announcement would destroy Palin's "family values" cred. It didn't.

I think that Palin is rational, at least to the extent that she does and says what she believes is in her best interest. Of course, people can misjudge what their interests are and end up blundering. If Palin gave birth to Trig but thought that it would be in her interest to claim that she faked the pregnancy, she would do so.

It isn't just with the pregnancy story that Palin has made inconsistent and unclear statements. If no one is able to prove that she faked the pregnancy, it isn't a great loss.

Joie Vouet said...

Someone who works to unite adopted children with their birth parent(s) has sent what may be some interesting information about Alaska's birth certificates:

"In Alaska, as with most every state, when a child is adopted they are issued an ‘Amended’ birth certificate. This looks different than the basic birth certificate, and usually the word Amended is on the certificate." ...

Joie Vouet said...

Yes, an Alaskan adoptee's birth certificate will be marked "Amended," if the original is changed (name change ...)

The birth certificate is probative.

theperilsofpalins said...

Please show a link to the Alaskan information that clearly shows that the word "amended" will be on the non-original birth certificate. I spent hours today looking this up, from reading through Alaska adoptive law to general information about birth certificates. I could find NO mention of the word "amended" being on the birth certificate. If this is really the case, then somebody PLEASE provide the actual links, law, etc. that shows absolutely that in the case of adoption, the Alaska birth certificate will include the word "amended." Thank you.

Joie Vouet said...

Alaska statutes section 18.50.290. Corrections and amendments.

(a) A certificate or record registered by the bureau may be amended only in accordance with this chapter and the regulations the department adopts to protect the integrity and accuracy of vital statistics records.

(b) A certificate that is amended under this section shall be marked "amended," with the date of amendment. A summary description of the evidence submitted in support of the amendment shall be endorsed on or made a part of the record. The department shall prescribe by regulation the conditions under which additions or minor corrections may be made to vital statistics records without the certificate being considered amended.

(c) Upon receipt of a certified copy of a court order changing the name of a person born in the state or a person born outside the United States whose adoptive parents are residents of the state at the time of the adoption and upon request of the person or the person's parent, guardian, or legal representative, the state registrar shall amend the certificate of birth to reflect the new name.

(d) When a certificate is corrected or amended under this section, the state registrar shall instruct the local custodian of the copy of the certificate to make the changes in the copy.

Joie Vouet said...

However, Alaska Admin. Code, Title 7, paragraph 5, section 900 may be contradictory:

A court order of legal change of name, accompanied by the proper request that it be entered on the appropriate certificate, shall be considered an amendment, and so entered and indicated. Authorized legitimation entries and additional information entered on presumptive death certificates shall be considered amendments, and so indicated. A new certificate of birth following legitimation or adoption shall not be considered amended, and shall not in any way be so marked. When extensive corrections or major alterations are authorized on a certificate, other than cases specified hereinabove, the State Registrar shall determine the feasibility of the alternative method of filing a new certificate at that time, marked "Amended" and containing a statement of the circumstances, and a description of the evidence submitted. In such cases the original certificate shall be retained as evidence.

(emphasis added)

dianedp said...

Even if she is Trigs birth mother, her irresponsible and reckless actions put that poor baby in danger.

But, how she ever managed to look that slim in her 5th pregnancy is beyond me.

Joie Vouet said...

7 AAC 05.720. Form of certificate:

The new birth certificate shall be prepared upon the same type of form, and look as much like a regular birth certificate as possible. Nothing on it shall state or refer to the fact that it is a new certificate. The actual date and place of birth shall be shown, and any question of legitimacy shall be answered in the affirmative. The name on the birth certificate shall be as ordered in the decree, if so specified; otherwise as requested by the parents. The name of the attendant or other person signing the original certificate shall be copied on the new certificate. The personal particulars shall reflect as much as possible the new situation of adoption or legitimation, and these and any other items shall be completed as specified by the State Registrar.

Joie Vouet said...

7 AAC 05.740. Procedure on adoption, however, implies that an original birth certificate (in the case of adoption) is not "lost:"

Upon receipt of a report that an adoption has been vacated, the original certificate of birth shall be restored to its place in the files; and the new certificate together with all evidence and related material shall be sealed away from inspection except upon order of a superior court, or for administrative inspection by the State Registrar.

And 7 AAC 05.760. Sealing of copies:

When a new certificate of birth is established in the bureau, the State Registrar shall direct that any local copies of the original record in the custody of local recorders be sealed away from inspection except upon order of a superior court or demand of the State Registrar. Upon the vacation of any adoption, the State Registrar shall direct the proper disposition of any pertinent local records. The State Registrar may supply a copy of the new certificate to the same local recorder to substitute in place of the original copy.

Joie Vouet said...

7 AAC 05.720. Form of certificate:

The new birth certificate shall be prepared upon the same type of form, and look as much like a regular birth certificate as possible. Nothing on it shall state or refer to the fact that it is a new certificate. The actual date and place of birth shall be shown, and any question of legitimacy shall be answered in the affirmative. The name on the birth certificate shall be as ordered in the decree, if so specified; otherwise as requested by the parents. The name of the attendant or other person signing the original certificate shall be copied on the new certificate. The personal particulars shall reflect as much as possible the new situation of adoption or legitimation, and these and any other items shall be completed as specified by the State Registrar.

-----

This section and other parts of the code are concerned with a name change of the adoptee. However, the part of Section 990 of para. 5 which I've emphasized, above, might be construed to mean that the name of the mother may be changed.

The section only requires that the date of birth, place of birth and name of the original signer to be copied to the new certificate.

The section seems to rule out an "Amended" marking.

Joie Vouet said...

7 AAC 05.875. Corrections and amendments:

Any correction or amendment to a certificate or record required by the Vital Statistics Act and related laws and regulations shall be made only in accordance with these regulations and the instructions of the State Registrar. ...

-----

The authority for 7 AAC 05.875 is given as AS 18.50.290, which does state, in (b):

The department shall prescribe by regulation the conditions under which additions or minor corrections may be made to vital statistics records without the certificate being considered amended.

So, I don't believe (given 7 AAC 05.720) that a new certificate for an adoptee or legitimized child will be marked "Amended." I believe "these regulations" are 7 AAC 05.

Conspiracy theorists may be delighted to know that 7 AAC 05.875 provides for corrections and amendments instructed by the State Registrar.

Joie Vouet said...

No one should consider what I've written here about Alaskan law on vital statistics to be legal advice; it's just a thinking out loud rush through the law. The best advice on this matter would be obtained by speaking with an expert on Alaskan family and vital statistics law.

Joie Vouet said...

Interestingly, President Obama has released his "long form" birth certificate. CNN story

Some have asked why Sarah Palin doesn't release Trig's birth certificate to quash the rumors and make fools of all the conspiracy theorists. One reason to wait is to achieve maximum impact (make fools of the largest number of people possible). Too, Trig Palin isn't President or running for President, which is an office that requires one to be a certain age and a "natural born" citizen, which are things that can only be proven with a birth certificate.

Joie Vouet said...

Whoa, Baby! at April 26, 2011 12:34 AM,

You are incorrect.

Joie Vouet said...

Nancy at April 25, 2011 11:50 PM,

A new birth certificate is also required to carry the name of the signer of the old certificate.